Diego Rivera Mural

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Six murals by one of the country’s most renowned artists, Diego Rivera.  Three of the murals are publicly unseen, late works by the world famous Mexican artist who died more than 60 years ago made and his name painting massive murals on buildings from Mexico City to New York.

The mansion was built on a cliff in Acapulco’s hey day in the middle of the last century, and is on the market for a minimum of six million dollars.
“There are (three) unknown murals inside. Only the ones that can be seen from the street are known,”
Rivera created the murals between 1955 and 1957 — the year he died.
On the outside of the house which is called “Exekatlkalli” or “House of the Winds” in the indigenous Nahuatl language — depicts an Aztec serpent god in a long stone mosaic.
Olmedo died in 2002 and passed the property, which includes a tropical garden and a swimming pool overlooking the Pacific, to her grandchildren who now live in the United States and wish to sell it.
Rivera’s work cannot leave the country because it is considered to be part of Mexico’s cultural heritage, but private individuals can buy the property.

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